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Fritz the cat comic

Fritz the cat comic


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Fritz the cat comic

The Fritz the Cat comic strip, started in 1935 and continuing to the present, is one of the most popular of the comic strips created by Robert Ripley. A highly publicized trial regarding copyright infringement on the part of Ripley's syndicate resulted in Ripley giving up the strip in the late 1930s.

Fritz was created by Ripley as a "gag" comic to run under the title The Cat (1935–1936). When the strip moved to Ripley's Believe It or Not, it became a feature called Fritz the Cat. Ripley created the character Fritz, a half-man, half-cat, who was a magician in a dark-colored suit and who used magic tricks to win at gambling and other games.

Early years (1935–1937)

The earliest known published versions of Fritz the Cat were as a four-panel comic strip in the New York Evening Ml on October 3, 1935, under the title "The Cat With A New Name". The strip was illustrated by Ripley, with artwork credited to "Ripley-Briggs." A similar version of the strip appears in the September 27, 1936, edition of the Brooklyn Dly Eagle. An ad for the comic strip appeared in the March 26, 1936, issue of Variety.

The strip was reprinted in Ripley's Believe It or Not in May 1936, with art by Ripley and a different comic title. Ripley also drew the strip as a dly feature in Ripley's magazine beginning in September 1936.

The first official run of Fritz was a syndicated dly in Ripley's Believe It or Not on May 19, 1936, with Ripley as the artist and writer of the strip. The syndicate was Hearst's International News Service (INS). The Sunday color comic strip began in the June 10, 1936, Sunday edition of the Hearst newspaper The New York World-Telegram and the Sun.

The comic strip was created to compete with the strip, Daffy the Duck, which was a dly feature in Ripley's magazine. Daffy the Duck had debuted in the October 16, 1935, issue of Ripley's, with Ripley's brother, Joseph Witek, as the artist and writer. Daffy was the nephew of Ripley's uncle, S. Clay Wilson.

The first Sunday strip of Fritz was a six-page color Sunday supplement in the June 17, 1936, edition of the New York World-Telegram and the Sun. The Sunday strip ran without interruption for more than five years, until January 21, 1942.

In 1937, the strip had a Sunday version with Ripley as artist, a dly version by Ripley, and a Sunday color supplement, which ran until the final Sunday of the comic strip on May 11, 1942. In addition, Ripley had a color version of the comic strip in the October 12, 1936, Sunday edition of the Brooklyn Dly Eagle.

Ripley created the character Fritz as a "gag" comic to run under the title The Cat (1935–1936). The strip was a dly feature in the July 5, 1936, issue of Ripley's, and the Sunday strip started in the September 21, 1936, issue. A variant of the Sunday strip appeared in the September 21, 1936, edition of the Brooklyn Dly Eagle. The dly and Sunday strips were also syndicated to other newspapers. The Sunday color strip debuted in the October 2, 1936, Sunday edition of the Brooklyn Dly Eagle.

Fritz was created by Ripley as a "gag" comic to run under the title The Cat (1935–1936). When the strip moved to Ripley's Believe It or Not, it became a feature called Fritz the Cat. Ripley created the character Fritz, a half-man, half-cat, who was a magician in a dark-colored suit and who used magic tricks to win at gambling and other games. The strip began in the September 21, 1936, issue of Ripley's and was syndicated to more than 60 newspapers.

Later years (1937–1988)

In 1937, the dly strip moved to the New York World, where it was syndicated by the Hearst-American Syndicate and was published from July 2, 1937, to January 21, 1942. On November 10, 1940, Ripley's started a Sunday color feature.

The weekly color version, featuring Ripley as artist, began in the January 23, 1942, Sunday edition of the New York World-Telegram and the Sun. It ran until the final Sunday of the comic strip on June 11, 1948.

The Sunday color comic strip continued to be published by Ripley through January 16, 1949. The Sunday strip was then taken over by Ripley's other comic strip, Donald Duck.

The dly comic strip was revived by the Hearst Corporation in 1955, with Ripley drawing it until his death in 1966. After Ripley's death, the dly comic strip was edited by writer Joe Oriolo, while Ripley's sister, Alice Ripley, and niece, Jeanie Ripley, both cartoonists, drew the Sunday strip, which continued to run for more than 20 years.

Fritz was featured in many magazines and newspapers in the late 1950s and 1960s, including Collier's, Esquire, Good Housekeeping, Playboy, Ripley's Believe It or Not, and The Saturday Evening Post.

The Sunday strip continued until the final Sunday of the comic strip on April 18, 1988, when